'Information design' Category

What plant is that? Ingenious efforts to make identification easier


One symptom of our society’s decreasing connection with nature is that hardly anyone knows the names of plant species any more, and it’s not entirely due to too much time spent staring at screens. It’s also because identifying plant and animals – especially plants – can be very, very hard: while there are 10,000 bird species worldwide (of which 1,100 in the U.S. and 514 in Germany) and 3,600 snakes, the plant enthusiast must contend with 400,000 species globally (U.S: 17,000; Germany: 4,100). Still. the diversity champions are the beetles, with as many species – just species of beetles – as there are plants.

There are two main reasons for the difficulty in identifying plants, one intrinsic to plants themselves and one more human-centric, and this post is about how botanists have made the impediments a little less impeding. The relevance to Germany is that nowadays it has some outstanding information design in the area of plant identification, although in prior decades the U.S., U.K. and Australia also had fascinating innovations that are now nearly forgotten. (more…)

The Great Urban Tree Map Showdown

Berlin’s map is for pros, New York City’s is for the masses.

 

I have noticed the online tree maps from the Berlin and New York City parks departments are very different and decided to compare them. Both cities have mapped their street trees – allegedly all of them – and made interactive maps and data publicly available but they have interesting differences.

normal map w one tree's data file narrow

Berlin

Battery Park w overall city stats narrow

New York City

 

 

 

(more…)

Book Report: Early nature conservation in Germany

Two remarkable finds from a flea market last week are fascinating evidence of how the topic of the interactions between people and nature gained recognition at quite an early date in Germany, before World War II and arguably well before it caught on in the United States.  These are two books for popular audiences, from 1921 and 1939, that combine ecology, geography, botany and cultural history in a way that, to the best of my knowledge, didn’t show in the U.S. until some decades later.

IMG_20160817_123005

Alpine Plants and their Protection

 

IMG_20160817_155153small

Land and People in the Lüneburg Heath

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From ancient Roman times clear up to the present, much has been written on the Germans’ distinctive relationship with the natural world, a connection with both positive aspects (conservation, health, alleged arcadian ‘vigor’ in contrast to decadent Roman refinement) and negative (some of the most virulent nationalism in all human history). Also, Germany was one of the birthplaces of modern ecology in the 19th century, along with England and France. So here’s some tangible evidence of how people were learning about nature before WWII.

Picture3

Emergency rescue and plant poaching observation post, from ‘Alpine Plants and their Protection

IMG_20160817_155315edit

29 volumes of ‘Land and People’

 

(more…)